Meet the lucy Design Team

There are seven women behind lucy’s designs. Three are working mothers. Two are runners, including one training for the Tokyo Marathon. One is a Pilates devotee. All are yogis. They come from a range of backgrounds, ages, and expertise. Inside their Bay Area office, they design and wear-test their goods, drawing inspiration from the runways, the street, the gym, pop culture, and beyond. Their collective chemistry inspires a new garment, from sketch to reality, that is always rooted in performance, and they couldn’t be more excited for their new fall line launching soon. Here’s what makes them tick and what keeps them moving.

Keryn Francisco, Creative Director

How does lucy’s designs reflect your fashion influences?

I prefer minimalistic styling. Women like Charlize Theron and Angelina Jolie exude poise and confidence, whether in flats or heels or even when their kids are hanging off them. I’ve always been fascinated by Audrey Hepburn and Hubert Givenchy’s collaboration — I think making a woman feel comfortable, and most herself is the goal of every good fashion designer…and how to make that style “iconic.”

What’s the vibe of your design team?

Einstein describes creativity as “intelligence having fun.” The team is a smart group of women with a great sense of humor that permeates every day.

How does your team work to bring seasons to life? 

It’s easy to agree on the best ideas when you see them in the context of many ideas, especially when you see them on an ideation wall. The Wall talks back to us and stories become obvious; the biggest cluster usually wins, and those concepts survive the development process.

What sets the upcoming fall collection apart from past seasons? 

We are cranking up the volume on style and versatility, offering a range of silhouettes from tight to relaxed to loose, which allows for endless layering opportunities.

Go-to workout: Classical Pilates

Maria, Senior Designer

What’s your newest inspiration?

Hand-dyeing fabrics and apparel using natural dyes. I’ve been experimenting in my backyard with indigo and other plant dyes.

What’s one lucy item that perfectly translates from workout to out and about?

Lucy Hatha Leggings! My favorite versatile outfit is high-rise leggings, a workout tank, and a denim jacket.

How do you challenge yourself at work?

By exploring many options before landing on a final design. You will reach a place you never knew was possible by continuing to push and hunt for bigger and better ideas.

What’s your starting point for a design?

Form follows function

Go-to workout: I don’t have one. I’ve always liked to incorporate a variety of activities to keep me motivated.

Jennifer,  Senior Designer

What always inspires you?

Anything different or just slightly off

Your design point of view in three words?

Simple, organic, confident

Besides exercise, what keeps your creative juices flowing?

Meditation, laughing, acupuncture, and browsing Farmers Markets

What’s a lesson about the creative process you would pass on to an aspiring designer?

Always take the time to create an inspiring space, mental and physical, for yourself at the beginning of every design season

Go-to workout: Anything outside

Erin, Associate Designer

Who are your pop culture icons?

My number one is always Kate Moss. And then Grace Kelly and Courtney Love, circa 90s. Supermodels and music videos; Stephanie Seymour in the November Rain video, Robert Palmer videos. Patrick Nagel illustrations. I’m a pop culture junkie.

What’s your styling tip for turning a workout outfit into a street look?

Booties, a smart jacket, and a scarf

How did being pregnant change up your fitness style?

I shamelessly wear leggings as pants and sports bras as regular bras now (I’m eight months). I’m incorporating more basic fitness pieces into my day-to-day wardrobe.

What’s your approach to challenges?

Trust your gut, don’t overthink it, and be open to criticism (it can help you grow as a designer and help hone your aesthetic). But don’t be afraid to stand your ground when you know you’re right — it’s your job to have an opinion.

Go-to workout: Bikram yoga

Christine, Designer

Who are your pop culture icons?

Jim Henson and the Muppets

What keeps you on top of your design game? 

Getting away from the computer to observe the world is really important to staying fresh and understanding all the small nuances of design that make things modern. Getting out helps me piece together all the information found online into something important and relevant.

If you had a Post-it daily reminder at your desk, what would it read?

Keep it simple

How do you deal with a creative block?

I tell myself it’s okay to not have all the answers right away. Sometimes you have to give ideas time to work themselves out.

Go-to workout: Running

Allison, Design Assistant

If you were a fashion icon in a past life, who would it be?

Cleopatra

What other creative activities do you do outside of work?

Creating clothes or crafts. Coloring. Drawing. Art. Spending time outside.

When do you know it’s time to slow down and take a moment for yourself at work?

When I find myself being a living “spinning beach ball” (Mac users should understand). If I am getting frustrated or not achieving the results I want, I walk away and come back when I’m refreshed and ready to try again.

How do you stay focused?

I’ve spent some time figuring out my creative process. Once I found a good set of methods that worked, I stuck with them.

Go-to workout? Running

Natalie, Design Assistant

What’s your current creative influence?

San Francisco! I recently moved to the city, and I’m fascinated by the people and the vibrant culture.

Whose style inspires you?

Diane von Furstenberg, Rihanna, Lana Del Rey, Mary-Kate Olsen, Ashley Olsen, Coco Chanel — pretty much strong independent women.

What do you strive for when designing a garment?

Minimalism, comfort and making sure the piece is intentional.

What’s your design affirmation?

Always show myself in my designs!

See them in action! Go behind the scenes with the lucy design team:




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